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By Thomas Giblin, Kieran Kennedy, Deirdre McHugh

Strains and assesses the expansion of the Republic's economic climate from its separation from Britain within the early Nineteen Twenties via to the current. This booklet will be of curiosity to scholars of economics and Irish reviews.

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Such regions usually enjoyed an initial competitive advantage, in the form of, for example, close access to raw materials and fuel or proximity to markets. 3 The focus of the nationalist interpretation was therefore too narrow. It laid undue stress on the role of a single instrument, tariff protection, without adequate recognition of the more pervasive market failures involved in the Irish industrial decline. It is possible that these forces might have been countered, at least in part, had there been an independent government which was prepared to play a much more active role in overcoming barriers to entry and expansion.

These disadvantages were reinforced by the strong tendencies already noted for industry to become concentrated in particular geographic regions. Such regions usually enjoyed an initial competitive advantage, in the form of, for example, close access to raw materials and fuel or proximity to markets. 3 The focus of the nationalist interpretation was therefore too narrow. It laid undue stress on the role of a single instrument, tariff protection, without adequate recognition of the more pervasive market failures involved in the Irish industrial decline.

Ulster had a considerable linen export industry even in the eighteenth century, organised on a domestic basis and extending into adjacent areas of the south. In the early nineteenth century the value of linen exports from Ireland (mainly from Ulster) exceeded exports of the other two major commodities, cattle and corn. The role of Belfast then was as an organising and trading centre and twothirds of linen exports went through Belfast. The cotton industry was introduced in 1777 and expanded considerably in the next 40 years.

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